The Monsieur & Worn&Wound: A Guide to NATO watch straps

Posted on November 25, 2012

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I think it’s fantastic when watch reviewers like worn&wound start to parlay their immaculate tastes into curating some top end accessories and accoutrements for our beloved timepieces. Yes, the once humble blog on the watch industry has branched into launching their online store and creating a selection of NATO straps between two collections: the Model 1 and the NYC NATO.

Worn&Wound Leather NATO watch straps

Four different looks across Model 1 and NYC NATO collections- the Model 1 is a buckle and belt 2 piece with contrast stitching and black edged finishing. The NYC NATO is basically your nylon NATO strap on steroids- decidedly masculine with unfinished edges, the leather strap accents those fine watchmaking details we’ve become so accustomed too.

Available in both gold (really a mustard yellow) and graphite (think grey) nubuck leather for 20mm (regular diver) and 22mm (large diver) sizes. Buy your Leather NATO watch straps here and more importantly, don’t forget to buy the Worn&Wound spring bar tool so you don’t have to scratch up your “precious”.

Worn&Wound is proudly made in the USA by the way, definitely worth the $59 for the NYC NATO and $89 for the Model 1.

A guide to NATO watch straps

Widespread use of the nylon strap rose to British Ministry of Defence (MOD).  The standard issue NATO strap or requisition number G10 (as it's known in military circles) is also called the Zulu strap. It enters pop culture history when James Bond is seen breaking a "style rule" forgoing the usual leather strap watch with tuxedo and opting for functional wrist look.

Widespread use of the nylon strap rose to British Ministry of Defence (MOD). The standard issue NATO strap or requisition number G10 (as it’s known in military circles) is also called the Zulu strap. It enters pop culture history when James Bond is seen breaking a “style rule” forgoing the usual leather strap watch with tuxedo and opting for functional wrist look.

Though usually seen in "standard" Bond grey and black, NATO straps can be dressed up using brightly coloured straps. A dressy look is achieved by creating a matching ensemble.

Though usually seen in “standard” Bond grey and black, NATO straps can be dressed up using brightly coloured straps. A dressy look is achieved by creating a matching ensemble.

Commonly paired with 'tool' watches like divers and chronographs, the NATO strap can also be used with dress watches to achieve stylish contrast that engenders bystanders to take a second look.

Commonly paired with ‘tool’ watches like divers and chronographs, the NATO strap can also be used with dress watches to achieve stylish contrast that engenders bystanders to take a second look.

 

 

 

 

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